Distemper:
Closely related to the measles virus, canine distemper virus spreads from dog to dog through respiratory secretions and aerosol exposure. The signs include fever, nasal and eye discharge, coughing, vomiting, diarrhea, or seizures and other neurologic signs. Secondary bacterial infections are common and may be fatal. Immunize at two, three and four months of age and annually thereafter.

Infectious Canine Hepatitis:
Infection with canine adenovirus-1 may result in inflammation of the liver, severe kidney damage and death. Immunize at two, three and four months of age with an annual booster.

Canine Parvoviral Enteritis (Parvo Virus):
Characterized by fever, dehydration, inactivity, abdominal pain, vomiting and diarrhea that is often bloody, parvovirus infection can cause rapid deterioration and death, particularly in puppies. Immunize at two, three and four months of age with an optional dose at five months. Follow with an annual booster.

Canine Coronaviral Enteritis:
With signs similar to but usually less severe than those of canine parvoviral enteritis (above), canine coronavirus infection may also cause rapid or sudden death in puppies. Immunizations should begin at six weeks of age, and continue every two to three weeks with the final dose at 12 weeks of age. An annual booster is recommended.

Infectious Tracheobronchitis (Kennel Cough):
The most common bacterium isolated from dogs with kennel cough is Bordetella bronchiseptica. In addition to contributing to this highly contagious upper respiratory disease, canine bordetella may result in bacterial pneumonia. Puppies should be immunized after they are at least two-weeks-old, with a booster given annually or one week before boarding to lessen the risk of exposure. Two common viral agents involved in kennel cough are the parainfluenza virus and canine adenovirus-2. Immunize at two, three and four months of age and follow with an annual booster.

Leptospirosis:
This bacterial infection results from direct contact with infected urine, biting or ingestion of infected meat, and it can be transmitted from pets to man. The kidneys and the liver may sustain permanent damage. Immunizations should begin at six weeks of age, and continue every two to three weeks with the final dose at 16 weeks of age. An annual booster is recommended.

Rabies:
Transmitted through saliva from biting, all warm-blooded animals are susceptible to this viral infection. Severe damage to the central nervous system typically progresses to paralysis and death. Begin immunization at three months of age, repeat in one year and then according to local ordinances.

Canine Lyme Disease:
Characterized by lameness, heart or kidney disease and nerve disorders, Lyme disease is caused by the tick-borne bacterium Borrelia Burgdorferi. If you live in an area where the disease occurs, immunize every two to three weeks until puppies are 12 weeks old. Annual boosters are recommended.

These and other vaccinations may be recommended by your veterinarian depending on your dogs specific needs.

Don't gamble with you pet's health. Contact your veterinarian to have your pet tested today and start them on prevention and a long and healthy life.
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